Articles

Fishing Knots

Fishing Knots made easy

 

The Palomar Knot is easy to tie, exceptionally strong, and very popular with bass fishing pros for tying on jigs and worm hooks.  It's somewhat awkward to tie when using lures with treble hooks, but it is the recommended knot for braided lines.

1) Double about four inches of line and pass the loop through the eye.   

2) Let the lure or hook hang loose and tie and overhand knot in the doubled line.  Avoid twisting the line and don't over tighten.       

3) Pull the loop of line far enough to pass it over the lure or hook.  Make sure the loop passes completely over this attachment.        

4)  To tighten, pull the tag end while holding the standing line.  Clip the tag end.         

 

The Improved Clinch is very easy to tie, which is the main reason it's so popular for connecting monofilament to terminal tackle.  It's most effective on lines under 20-pound test.

1)  Pass the line through the eye of the hook, swivel, or lure.  Double back and make five turns around the standing line.

2)  Holding the coils in place, thread the tag end of the first loop above the eye, then through the big loop.

3)  Hold the tag end and standing line while pulling up the coils.  Make sure the coils are in a spiral, not overlapping each other.  Slide against the eye.

4)  Clip the tag end.

 

The Two-Turn Clinch has been around since the turn of the century.  It's stronger than the Improved Clinch and almost as easy to tie.

1)  Pass the line through the eye of the hook, swivel, or lure two times to form a small double loop.           

2)  Finish the loop between your thumb and forefinger, and make five turns around the standing line.  Insert the tag end through the double loop.

3)  Hold the tag end and standing line while pulling up the coils.  Make sure the coils are in a spiral, not overlapping each other.  Slide against the eye.          

4)  Clip the tag end.

 

 

Non-Slip Mono-Loop

This is an exceptionally strong loop when tied correctly.  But be sure to use the right number of turns (as determined by the line's strength rating--see Step 2), and tighten your knot very carefully.

1)  This is one of the few knots where you begin the knot before you insert the line in the hook's eye. Make a simple overhand knot. Bring the tag end through the eye and back through the overhand knot. You must return the tag end through the overhand knot the same way you entered it (see illustration).

2)  Make the recommended number of turns with the tag end around the standing line.

Pound Test    Turns

6 to 8  7

8 to 12            5

15 to 40          4

50 to 60          3

60+      2

 

3)  Return the tag end through the overhand knot the same way you exited teh knot (see illustration).

4) Draw on the tag end until the knot forms together. Then pull on the standing line to close the knot well.  Finally, pull on both the tag end and standing line to assure the connection is as tight as possible.

Sizing the Loop 

The size of the loop is determined by three factors:

1)  The smaller the overhand knot, the smaller the loop. For small loops, try to make the overhand knot no more than 3/16 inch in diameter (about the size of a large split shot.

2)  Once the tag end has been inserted through the hook eye and back through the overhand knot, hold the overhand knot lightly, and pull on the tag end. This will carry the overhand knot down near the hook eye.

3)  When finally closing the knot, pull out as much slack as possible between the tag end and standing line.

 

 

 

 

Surgeon's Knot

This is an exceptionally strong, simple-to-tie knot for joining lines of different diameters.  It's the best knot around for tying tippets to fly-fishing leaders, too.

1)  Lay the line and leader alongside each other, overlapping six to eight inches.

2)  Treating the two like a single line, tie an overhand knot, pulling the entire leader through the loop.     

3)  Leaving the loop of the overhand knot open, pull the tag ends of both the line and leader through again.        

4)  Hold both lines and both ends to pull the knot tight.  Clip ends close to avoid foul-ups in the rod guides.

 

The Surgeon's Loop is a quick and easy way to put a loop in the end of a line.  It's tied in the same manner as the Surgeon's Knot.

1)  Double the end of the line to form a loop, and then tie an overhand knot at the base of the double line.         

2)  Leaving the loop open, bring the double line through once more.         

3)  Hold the standing line and tag end, and pull the loop to tighten the knot.  You can adjust the loop size by shifting the loose knot before tightening.

4)  Clip the tag end

 

 

 

The Uni-Knot

Strong, reliable, and easy to tie, the Uni-Knot is an excellent knot for securing line to terminal tackle.  It's also the foundation of the entire Uni-Knot system.  Note that the Uni-Knot can be left as a loop or tightened down so it's snug to the hook eye

(see Steps 4 and 5).

1)  Run at least six inches of line through the eye of the hook, swivel, or lure, and fold to make two parallel lines.  Bring the tag end of the line back in a circle toward the hook or lure.

2)  Make six turns with the tag end around the double line and through the circle.

3)  Hold the double line at the point where it passes through the eye, and pull the tag end to snug up the turns.

4)  To create a loop connection: Adjust the loop size by sliding the knot up or down the standing line.  Then pull the tag end with pliers to maximize tightness.

5)  To create a snug knot: Pull the standing line to slide the knot up against the eye.  Then continue pulling until the knot is tight.

6)  Trim the tag end flush with the closest coil on the knot

 

 

Using the Uni-Knot to Join Two Lines

1)  Overlap about 12 inches of the ends of two lines.  Form a Uni-Knot circle with the tag end of line "A."

2)  Wrap line "A" five times to form a Uni-Knot around line "B." 

Snug the knot by gently pulling on both ends of line "A" with enough tension to close the wraps, but not so tight that it actually grips line "B."

3)  Form a new Uni-Knot circle with the tag end of line "B" and wrap line "B" five times to form a Uni-Knot around line "A."  (Use only four turns for 60-, 80-, or 100-pound-test monofilament.)

4)  Gently pull line "B" with one hand and line "A" with the other to slide the two Uni-Knots together until they jam--then pull tight.  Then tighten the wraps around the standing lines by firmly pulling the tag ends of each Uni-Knot.

5)  Snip the tag ends.

Using the Uni-Knot to Snell a Hook

1)  Thread six inches of line through the eye of the hook.

2)  Hold the line against the hook's shank, and form a Uni-Knot circle.

3)  Make five to seven turns through the loop and around the standing line and hook's shank.

4)  Tighten by pulling the standing line in one direction and the tag end in the other.

We always carry a quick guide for fresh and saltwater fishing. Below is an example of a great one by Ande's

 

 

 

 



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